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4 | FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2017 BIG ISLAND ENTERTAINMENT SCENE | WEST HAWAII TODAY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT concert at the Pyramid House in Kailua-Kona. The 6 p.m. Saturday performance, “Beyond the Gates of Heaves,” features three harps and woodwinds. Pupu and refreshments will be provided. Tickets are $20. Info: Email behealthy108@aol.com. DMAC exhibit showcases traditional Japanese mokuhanga Donkey Mill Art Center presents its newest exhibition, “Globalizing Mokuhanga,” which is open to the public through Oct. 14. The exhibit is available to view during Donkey Mill’s open hours, 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. An artists’ reception will be held from 6-8 p.m. on Oct. 7 at the gallery. The event is free and open to the public. This exhibition of traditional Japanese mokuhanga woodblock prints is held in conjunction with the Third Triennial International Mokuhanga Conference, this year being held for the first time outside mokuhanga’s home country of Japan. The sold-out conference drawing artists from around the world will be held in Honolulu Sept. 28-Oct. 1, with satellite events at Donkey Mill Art Center on Hawaii Island from Oct. 3-8. “Globalizing Mokuhanga” provides the community and visitors an opportunity to learn and experience A splash of color in your interior spaces can liven up your breakfast routine or create an oasis to relax in at the end of a long day. Use Benjamin Moore® interior paint to bring a little of color inspiration into your home. Paint Like No Other® with a paint brand that is ranked Highest in Customer Satisfaction for Interior Paints by J.D Power Give us a call so we can help you choose the right Benjamin Moore® paint for your project. WE’LL HELP YOU BUILD BETTER HILO 935-0875 • KONA 334-4200 • WAIMEA 885-6036 EVEERVEYRTYHTHININGG North Kohala book group gets together Tuesday North Kohala Public Library’s book group meets at 11 a.m. on Tuesday in Kapaau. This month’s, the club will be discussing “Pilgrim at the Tinker Creek,” by Annie Dillard. “Pilgrim at Tinker Creek” is the story of a dramatic year in Virginia’s Roanoke Valley. Annie Dillard sets out to see what she can see. What she sees are astonishing incidents of “beauty tangled in a rapture with violence.” Her personal narrative highlights one year’s exploration on foot in the Virginia region through which Tinker Creek runs. In the summer, Dillard stalks muskrats in the creek and contemplates wave mechanics; in the fall, she watches a monarch butterfly migration and dreams of Arctic caribou. She tries to con a coot; she collects pond water and examines it under a microscope. She unties a snake skin, witnesses a flood, and plays king of the Meadow with a field of grasshoppers. The result is an exhilarating tale of nature and its seasons. Info: 889-6655. Continued on page 9 ➠ SET THE MOOD WITH A LITTLE COLOR the beauty of this traditional art form through a selection of contemporary mokuhanga prints from the permanent collection of the Mokuhanga Innovation Lab Artist in Residence program in Japan. This humbly-named printmaking style (“moku” means wood and “hanga” can be translated as printing) is a Japanese printing technique used for books and art with origins as early as the eighth century. Mokuhanga-style printing rose to fame in the West in the 18th century through the popularity of prints such as those by Hokusai and Hiroshige, and these images were at the heart of the West’s perception of Japanese art and culture. Mokuhanga differs from western-style woodblock printing most notably in its use of water-based inks, allowing for a wide array of vivid colors, glazes, and transparencies that are remarkably different from the oil based inks used in the West. Contemporary artists have been drawn to the appeal of mokuhanga as a flexible, nontoxic, and mobile method of creative expression that captures a distinctive quality of light. Mokuhanga traditions continue with contemporary programs both in Japan and beyond. The MI-LAB artist residency programs of Japan are designed to provide extensive knowledge of mokuhanga while preserving the art form and celebrating contemporary translations. In the past two decades alone, residencies in Japan have enabled more than 200 artists from around the world to study the art and traditions of mokuhanga. “Globalizing Mokuhanga” showcases ➠ Continued from page 3 Continued on page 8 ➠


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