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SATURDAY,4A NATION & WORLD MAY 28, 2016 | WEST HAWAII TODAY ‘MORAL AWAKENING’ Obama meets H-bomb survivors in historic Hiroshima visit HIROSHIMA, Japan — President Barack Obama laid a wreath at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial on Friday, telling an audience that included survivors of America’s atomic bombing in 1945 that technology as devastating as nuclear arms demands a “moral revolution.” Thousands of Japanese lined the route of the presidential motorcade to the memorial in the hopes of glimpsing Obama, the first sitting American president to visit the most potent symbol of the dawning of the nuclear age. Many watched the ceremony on their cellphones. “Seventy-one years ago, on a bright cloudless morning, death fell from the sky and the world was changed,” Obama said in opening his speech at the memorial. “Technological progress without an equivalent progress in human institutions can doom us,” Obama said, adding that such technology “requires a moral revolution as well.” In an emotional moment afterward, Obama embraced and shook hands with survivors of the attack, which exposed humanity to risks the president has repeatedly said the world must People gather at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan after U.S. President Barack Obama visited the site, Friday. MUNEYUKI TOMARI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS do far more to resolve. The first of those survivors, Sunao Tsuboi, a chairman of the Hiroshima branch of the Japan Confederation of A- and H-bomb Sufferers Organizations, gripped Obama’s hand and did not let go until he had spoken to him for some time. “I held his hand, and we didn’t need an interpreter,” Tsuboi, 91, said later. “I could understand what he wanted to say by his expression.” In another poignant moment, Obama exchanged an embrace with Shigeaki Mori, 79, who was 8 years old when the bomb fell. Mori spent decades researching the fates of U.S. prisoners of war who were killed in the bombing. For weeks, the White House had refused to say whether Obama, would meet survivors. It was a delicate decision. Many survivors long for an apology for an event that destroyed just about everyone and everything they knew, and there were small demonstrations near the ceremony on Friday by protesters demanding an apology. But Obama said before his trip that he would not apologize for the attack. Still, Obama’s homage to the victims and his speech were welcomed by many Japanese. “I am simply grateful for his visit,” said Tomoko Miyoshi, 50, who lost 10 relatives in the Hiroshima attack and wept as she watched Obama on her cellphone. In his speech, Obama, using the slow and deliberate cadence that he uses on only the most formal and consequential occasions, said that the bombing of Hiroshima demonstrated that “mankind possessed the means to destroy itself.” But he said that in the 71 years since the bombing, world institutions had grown up to help prevent a recurrence. Still, nations like the United States continue to possess thousands of nuclear weapons. And that is something that must change, he said. In a striking example of the gap between Obama’s vision of a nuclear weapons free world and the realities of purging them, a new Pentagon census of the American nuclear arsenal shows his administration has reduced the stockpile less than any other post-Cold War presidency. “We must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without them,” he said, although he quickly added: “We may not realize this goal in my lifetime, but persistent effort can roll back the possibility of catastrophe.” Still, he said, more was needed. Noting that far more primitive weapons than nuclear arms are causing widespread destruction today, Obama called for humanity to change its mindset about war. “The world was forever changed here, but today the children of this city will go through their day in peace,” Obama said. “What a precious thing that is. It is worth protecting, and then extending to every child. That is a future we can choose, a future in which Hiroshima and Nagasaki are known not as the dawn of atomic warfare but as the start of our own moral awakening.” BY GARDINER HARRIS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS OPINION SATURDAY MAY 28, 2016 | WEST HAWAII TODAY LETTERS | YOUR VOICE BY FABIOLA SANTIAGO | MIAMI HERALD What came first: the onslaught of intolerance playing out in our daily lives or the Donald Trump candidacy? It’s a circular phenomenon these days. But here’s a sliver of what Trump’s already “Great America” looks like before there’s even a presidential election and two nominees in place. “Get off the stage!” a woman in the crowd hollered at one of the best-known and most influential Latinas in this country. “Trash!” hollered another. What was María Elena Salinas’s crime to deserve that and other catcalls during a commencement speech Sunday before journalism graduates in California? The co-anchor of Univision Network News and the national news show “Aquí y Ahora” (Here and Now) mentioned Donald Trump — the media are being blamed for the rise of his candidacy, she said — and toward the end of her speech she said a few words of encouragement in Spanish to parents and students planning to work in Spanish-language media. “You are the ones who are going to build bridges, not walls,” she said. None of what she said was a surprise — nor inappropriate in the context of the event. In the audience at California State University, Fullerton, were graduating students and their parents celebrating one of the proudest moments of their lives. Forty percent of the student body is Hispanic, and administrators had asked her to say a few words in Spanish as a sign of inclusiveness. The university also conferred on the Mexican-American journalist, born and raised in California and a long-time Miami resident, an honorary doctorate. “If you allow me to say a few words in Spanish,” Salinas said, and someone called out, “No!” “English only, please!” one man yelled. What is most troubling about the heckling is that the setting for the disrespect was an American university, where freedom of speech is one of the most prized values, a place where youths come to elevate their lives, to forge a future. If universities aren’t a safe space for elevating discourse, then what is anymore? “It’s really sad,” Salinas told The Washington Post. “And it’s a testament to what has happened in our country. Our country is really divided.” As if the live heckling wasn’t spectacle enough, Salinas was then abused in a rampage of tweets with the hashtag #MakeAmericaGreatAgain on that favorite playground of Internet trolls, Twitter. Trump’s vulgar candidacy and the age of social media are the perfect storm. The New York billionaire (allegedly, given that he won’t show his tax IN BRIEF Couple’s killings are latest blow to town rocked by mudslide OSO, Wash. — The killings of Patrick Shunn and Monique Patenaude were a knife-twist of heartache in Oso, a tiny, rural community northeast of Seattle that was devastated in 2014 by the nation’s worst landslide disaster. The couple lived on a 21-acre riverfront spread abutting the scar where the hillside gave way, obliterating three dozen houses and killing 43 people. They shared a gated driveway with suspect John Blaine Reed, 53. Reed’s younger brother, Tony Clyde Reed, led authorities to the grave this week after returning from Mexico, where the pair fled after the killings. Each brother is charged with first-degree murder. 8 automakers recall over 12M vehicles for Takata air bags DETROIT — Eight automakers are recalling more than 12 million vehicles in the U.S. to replace potentially dangerous Takata air bag inflators. Documents detailing recalls by Honda, Fiat Chrysler, Toyota, Mazda, Nissan, Subaru, Ferrari and Mitsubishi were posted Friday by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. They’re part of a massive expansion of Takata air bag recalls announced earlier this month. Seventeen automakers are adding 35 million to 40 million inflators to what already was the largest auto recall in U.S. history. By wire source returns) launched his campaign with an ethnic tirade against Mexicans. He called Mexicans “drug dealers” and rapists and threw out of an Iowa press conference Salinas’ Univision co-anchor, Jorge Ramos, for questioning his derogatory remarks. Trump’s incendiary, damaging falsehoods have traveled fast and far. The crazier and more damaging they have become — rants against women, Muslims, his opponents — the stronger his following. Trump has reached the majority of delegates needed to clinch the GOP nomination as his most likely opponent. His victorious news conference Thursday was terrifying in the way he fed the prejudices of Americans who are struggling and fear the future and the world beyond our borders. I’m afraid to even say it, but Trump can win, no matter what journalists say, no matter how many fact checks show him to be the biggest liar in the presidential race. Pets suffer in all this The Humane Society’s issues, who knows? Yes, the truth will come out. It’s such a travesty that these animals depend on us 100 percent. They are totally helpless. They end up in these situations 100 percent because of people’s irresponsibility. Those owners should be put in the cages. That’s another story in itself. I have to comment how appalled I was that the humane society just throws these animals into the dump after they kill them (in mass)? There are signs everywhere that disposal of animals of any kind is prohibited. Regardless, the point is these poor creatures were abandoned by the people they probably loved with all their hearts, then are abandoned, killed and put in the dump like a piece of trash? An inconvenience. I don’t even know how to express the crushing pain of seeing that in the paper. Am I the only one who is mortified by this? Leonora Prince Kailua-Kona HIHS reputation own doing I had nothing but laughter as a reaction to the claim of “the blow it endured to its reputation” by HIHS. Reputation? This is the organization that I donated a piece of land to to build an animal shelter years ago. After several discussions with the executive director of the organization and signing over the deed to HIHS, they turned around to sell the property instead. I assume money was more important for them to buy poison to kill animals instead of caring for them. That’s the kind of reputation HIHS has, and will always be looked on accordingly. Obviously, my donations are directed elsewhere ever since! John Rabi Kailua-Kona Ugly energy of Trumpism infecting colleges


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